Upper East Side

Upper East Side

The Upper East Side, which lies between Central Park/Fifth Avenue, 59th Street, the East River, and 96th Street. The area incorporates several smaller neighborhoods, including Lenox Hill, Carnegie Hill, and Yorkville. Once known as the Silk Stocking District, it is now one of the most affluent neighborhoods in New York City. The area is host to some of the most famous museums in the world. The string of museums along Fifth Avenue fronting Central Park has been dubbed "Museum Mile", running between 82nd and 105th Streets. It was once named "Millionaire's Row." The following are among the cultural institutions on the Upper East Side: National Design Museum, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Irish Georgian Society, Jewish Museum of New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of the City of New York, Morgan Library & Museum, National Academy of Design, Neue Galerie, Society of Illustrators, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Many diplomatic missions are located in former mansions on the Upper East Side. These consulates include the following countries: France, Greece, Italy, India, Pakistan, Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Czech Republic, Iraq, Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire), Mali, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Poland, and Serbia. The Upper East Side has been the setting for an incredible number of films, television shows, books, and other media. Some of the most notable include: Breakfast at Tiffany's, The Great Gatsby, Kramer vs. Kramer, Manhattan, The Devil's Advocate, A Perfect Murder, Cruel Intentions, The Thomas Crown Affair, Eyes Wide Shut, Autumn in New York, American Psycho, 25th Hour, Two Weeks Notice, The Nanny Diaries, The Devil Wears Prada, Sex and the City, Made of Honor, Bride Wars, Gossip Girl, The Jeffersons, Diff'rent Strokes, The Nanny, Will & Grace, Lipstick Jungle, Ugly Betty, I Love Lucy, How I Met Your Mother, White Collar, The Odd Couple, The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot, and The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. The neighborhood has a long tradition of being home to some of the world's most wealthy, powerful and influential families and individuals. Some of the notable people who have lived here include: Woody Allen, Brooke Astor, Michael Bloomberg, Mariah Carey, Alexandra Daddario, Jamie Dimon, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Ricky Gervais, David H. Koch, Jeff Koons, Lady Gaga, Spike Lee, Madonna, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Joan Rivers, and Martin Scorsese.

Upper East Side

Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met), located in New York City, is the largest art museum in the United States and among the most visited art museums in the world. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is by area one of the world's largest art galleries. There is also a much smaller second location at The Cloisters in Upper Manhattan that features medieval art. Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from first-century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries. The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. It opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue. As of 2012, the Met occupies about 2,000,000 square feet. Admission is pay what you wish with a recommendation of $25.

Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, often referred to as The Guggenheim, is an art museum located at 1071 Fifth Avenue on the corner of East 89th Street in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is the permanent home of a renowned and continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. The museum was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952. In 1959, the museum moved from rented space to its current building, a landmark work of 20th-century architecture. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the cylindrical building, wider at the top than the bottom, was conceived as a "temple of the spirit". Its unique ramp gallery extends up from ground level in a long, continuous spiral along the outer edges of the building to end just under the ceiling skylight. The museum's collection has grown organically, over eight decades, and is founded upon several important private collections, beginning with Solomon R. Guggenheim's original collection. The collection is shared with the museum's sister museums in Bilbao, Spain, and elsewhere. In 2013, nearly 1.2 million people visited the museum, and it hosted the most popular exhibition in New York City.

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Updated: 22nd January, 2019 4:19 PM.